Significant Surge in Cardiac Arrest-Related Excess Deaths Observed During Intensive Vaccine Campaign in Washington

A recent study conducted in King County, Washington, has found a concerning correlation between the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines and a significant increase in excess deaths due to cardiac arrest.

Dr. Peter McCullough, a renowned cardiologist, led a team of investigators from the McCullough Foundation in analyzing the link between excess cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality during the intense vaccine campaign in the area.

The study revealed that as the percentage of people vaccinated increased, so did the number of excess deaths. This finding is particularly alarming considering the strong association between COVID-19 vaccines and myocarditis, a type of heart inflammation that can lead to cardiac arrest.

Autopsies performed on individuals who had received the vaccine and died suddenly confirmed myocarditis as the cause of death. From 2020 to 2023, excess cardiopulmonary arrest deaths in King County rose by a staggering 1236%, far surpassing what would be expected in a typical year.

Additionally, the general population of King County experienced a sharp decline during this time, making the increased deaths even more concerning.

When applying this data to the entire United States, it suggests a potential 49,240 excess deadly cardiopulmonary arrests from 2021 to 2023.

Dr. McCullough, unlike many doctors who shy away from criticizing vaccines for fear of professional repercussions, has been vocal about the dangers associated with COVID-19 jabs, particularly their negative effects on the heart. He has called for an immediate investigation into the vaccine status of victims and a halt to further COVID-19 vaccination.

The study’s researchers also emphasized the need for further studies to determine if other regions experienced similar trends.

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By Kate Stephenson
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